Dr. Robert M. Groves Robert M. Groves is the Gerard J. Campbell, S.J. Professor in the Math and Statistics Department as well as the Sociology Department at Georgetown University where he has served as the Executive Vice President and Provost since 2012. Groves is a Social Statistician, who studies the impact of social cognitive and behavioral influences on the quality of statistical information. His research has focused on the impact of mode of data collection on responses in sample surveys, the social and political influences on survey participation, the use of adaptive research designs to improve the cost and error properties of statistics, and public concerns about privacy affecting attitudes toward statistical agencies. He has authored or co-authored seven books and scores of peer-reviewed articles. His 1989 book, Survey Errors and Survey Costs, was named one of the 50 most influential books in survey research by the American Association of Public Opinion Research. His book, Nonresponse in Household Interview Surveys, with Mick Couper, received the 2008 American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR) Book Award. His co-authored book, Survey Nonresponse, received the 2011 AAPOR Book Award. He served as the Director of the U.S. Census Bureau between 2009-2012. Groves serves on several boards and advisory committees including the National Research Council Board of the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, Pew Research Center Board, the Population Reference Bureau, the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research, and the Statistics Canada Advisory Committee. He is an elected member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, of the Institute of Medicine of the U.S. National Academies, of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and of the International Statistical Institute.

Dr. Robert M. Groves

Robert M. Groves is the Gerard J. Campbell, S.J. Professor in the Math and Statistics Department as well as the Sociology Department at Georgetown University where he has served as the Executive Vice President and Provost since 2012.

Groves is a Social Statistician, who studies the impact of social cognitive and behavioral influences on the quality of statistical information.

His research has focused on the impact of mode of data collection on responses in sample surveys, the social and political influences on survey participation, the use of adaptive research designs to improve the cost and error properties of statistics, and public concerns about privacy affecting attitudes toward statistical agencies.

He has authored or co-authored seven books and scores of peer-reviewed articles. His 1989 book, Survey Errors and Survey Costs, was named one of the 50 most influential books in survey research by the American Association of Public Opinion Research. His book, Nonresponse in Household Interview Surveys, with Mick Couper, received the 2008 American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR) Book Award. His co-authored book, Survey Nonresponse, received the 2011 AAPOR Book Award. He served as the Director of the U.S. Census Bureau between 2009-2012.

Groves serves on several boards and advisory committees including the National Research Council Board of the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, Pew Research Center Board, the Population Reference Bureau, the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research, and the Statistics Canada Advisory Committee. He is an elected member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, of the Institute of Medicine of the U.S. National Academies, of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and of the International Statistical Institute.

Robert Cardillo Mr. Robert Cardillo is the sixth Director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). Mr. Cardillo leads and directs NGA under the authorities of the Secretary of Defense and the Director of National Intelligence. He became NGA’s director on October 3, 2014. Prior to this assignment, Mr. Cardillo served as the first Deputy Director for Intelligence Integration, Office of the Director of National Intelligence, from 2010 to 2014. In addition, he served as the Deputy Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) and the Deputy Director for Analysis, DIA, from 2006 to 2010. In the summer of 2009, Mr. Cardillo served as the Acting J2, a first for a civilian, in support of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Before he moved to DIA, Mr. Cardillo led Analysis and Production as well as Source Operations and Management at NGA from 2002 to 2006. Mr. Cardillo’s leadership assignments at NGA also included Congressional Affairs, Public Affairs, and Corporate Relations. Mr. Cardillo began his career with DIA in 1983 as an imagery analyst, and he was selected to the Senior Executive Service in 2000. Mr. Cardillo earned a B.A. in Government from Cornell University in 1983 and an M.A. in National Security Studies from Georgetown University in 1988. Mr. Cardillo is the recipient of the Director of National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medal, the Presidential Rank of Distinguished Executive, the Presidential Rank of Meritorious Executive, and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Meritorious Civilian Service Award. Mr. Cardillo resides in Northern Virginia with his wife. They have three children and three grandchildren.

Robert Cardillo

Mr. Robert Cardillo is the sixth Director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). Mr. Cardillo leads and directs NGA under the authorities of the Secretary of Defense and the Director of National Intelligence. He became NGA’s director on October 3, 2014.

Prior to this assignment, Mr. Cardillo served as the first Deputy Director for Intelligence Integration, Office of the Director of National Intelligence, from 2010 to 2014. In addition, he served as the Deputy Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) and the Deputy Director for Analysis, DIA, from 2006 to 2010. In the summer of 2009, Mr. Cardillo served as the Acting J2, a first for a civilian, in support of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Before he moved to DIA, Mr. Cardillo led Analysis and Production as well as Source Operations and Management at NGA from 2002 to 2006. Mr. Cardillo’s leadership assignments at NGA also included Congressional Affairs, Public Affairs, and Corporate Relations.

Mr. Cardillo began his career with DIA in 1983 as an imagery analyst, and he was selected to the Senior Executive Service in 2000. Mr. Cardillo earned a B.A. in Government from Cornell University in 1983 and an M.A. in National Security Studies from Georgetown University in 1988.

Mr. Cardillo is the recipient of the Director of National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medal, the Presidential Rank of Distinguished Executive, the Presidential Rank of Meritorious Executive, and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Meritorious Civilian Service Award.

Mr. Cardillo resides in Northern Virginia with his wife. They have three children and three grandchildren.

Dr. Suzanne Fry Suzanne Fry is Director of the Strategic Futures Group at the National Intelligence Council (NIC).  The NIC supports the Director of National Intelligence in his role as head of the Intelligence Community (IC) and serves as a bridge between the intelligence and policy communities, a source of deep substantive expertise on all regions and functional intelligence issues and a facilitator of Intelligence Community collaboration and outreach.  At the NIC, Dr. Fry is responsible for global issues and long-range analysis as well as the Global Trends series, the NIC’s flagship unclassified assessment of the future strategic landscape.  The most recent report, Global Trends: Paradox of Progress, published in January, may be found at https://www.dni.gov/index.php/global-trends-home.  Prior to joining the NIC, Dr. Fry worked on a range of governance, instability, and strategic warning issues worldwide and led the U.S. Intelligence Community’s Political Instability Task Force.  Dr. Fry received her Ph.D. in Politics from New York University and a B.A. in Government and International Studies from the University of Notre Dame. She is originally from San Diego, California.

Dr. Suzanne Fry

Suzanne Fry is Director of the Strategic Futures Group at the National Intelligence Council (NIC).  The NIC supports the Director of National Intelligence in his role as head of the Intelligence Community (IC) and serves as a bridge between the intelligence and policy communities, a source of deep substantive expertise on all regions and functional intelligence issues and a facilitator of Intelligence Community collaboration and outreach.  At the NIC, Dr. Fry is responsible for global issues and long-range analysis as well as the Global Trends series, the NIC’s flagship unclassified assessment of the future strategic landscape.  The most recent report, Global Trends: Paradox of Progress, published in January, may be found at https://www.dni.gov/index.php/global-trends-home. 

Prior to joining the NIC, Dr. Fry worked on a range of governance, instability, and strategic warning issues worldwide and led the U.S. Intelligence Community’s Political Instability Task Force.  Dr. Fry received her Ph.D. in Politics from New York University and a B.A. in Government and International Studies from the University of Notre Dame. She is originally from San Diego, California.

 
Dr. Michael O'Hanlon Michael O'Hanlon is a senior fellow in Foreign Policy at the Brookings Institution, where he specializes in U.S. defense strategy, the use of military force, and American national security policy. He is also director of research for the Foreign Policy program at Brookings. He is an adjunct professor at Columbia, Princeton, and Syracuse universities, and the University of Denver. He is also a member of the International Institute for Strategic Studies. O’Hanlon was a member of the external advisory board at the Central Intelligence Agency from 2011 to 2012. O’Hanlon’s latest book is The Future of Land Warfare (Brookings, 2015). Since then, O’Hanlon has written three Marshall Papers, the new signature monograph series from Brookings’s Foreign Policy program. They are: Beyond NATO: A New Security Architecture for Eastern Europe (2017), The $650 Billion Bargain: The Case for Modest Growth in America’s Defense Budget (2016), and, with Jim Steinberg, A Glass Half Full?: Rebalance, Reassurance, and Resolve in the U.S.-China Strategic Relationship (also 2017). O'Hanlon is also the author of Healing the Wounded Giant (Brookings), and Strategic Reassurance and Resolve: U.S.-China Relations in the 21st Century (the latter with Jim Steinberg, published by Princeton University Press, 2014). Previously, he wrote Bending History: Barack Obama’s Foreign Policy (with Martin Indyk and Kenneth Lieberthal, Brookings, March 2012); The Wounded Giant: America’s Armed Forces in an Age of Austerity (Penguin Press, 2011); A Skeptic’s Case for Nuclear Disarmament (Brookings, 2010); Toughing It Out in Afghanistan (with Hassina Sherjan, Brookings, 2010); and The Science of War (Princeton University Press, 2009). He continues to co-author Brookings’s Afghanistan Index. O’Hanlon’s other books include A War Like No Other, about the U.S.-China relationship and the Taiwan issue, with Richard Bush; a multi-author volume, Protecting the Homeland 2006/2007 (Brookings, 2006); Defense Strategy for the Post-Saddam Era (Brookings, 2005); The Future of Arms Control (Brookings, 2005), co-authored with Michael Levi; Neither Star Wars nor Sanctuary: Constraining the Military Uses of Space (Brookings, 2004); and Crisis on the Korean Peninsula (McGraw-Hill) with Mike Mochizuki in 2003. O’Hanlon has written several hundred op-eds in newspapers including The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Times, The Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Japan Times, USA Today, and Pakistan’s Dawn paper. O’Hanlon has appeared on television or spoken on the radio more than 3,000 times since September 11, 2001. O'Hanlon was an analyst at the Congressional Budget Office from 1989 to 1994. He also worked previously at the Institute for Defense Analyses. His Ph.D. from Princeton is in public and international affairs; his B.S. and M.S., also from Princeton, are in the physical sciences. He served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Congo/Kinshasa (the former Zaire) from 1982 to 1984, where he taught college and high school physics in French.

Dr. Michael O'Hanlon

Michael O'Hanlon is a senior fellow in Foreign Policy at the Brookings Institution, where he specializes in U.S. defense strategy, the use of military force, and American national security policy. He is also director of research for the Foreign Policy program at Brookings. He is an adjunct professor at Columbia, Princeton, and Syracuse universities, and the University of Denver. He is also a member of the International Institute for Strategic Studies. O’Hanlon was a member of the external advisory board at the Central Intelligence Agency from 2011 to 2012.

O’Hanlon’s latest book is The Future of Land Warfare (Brookings, 2015). Since then, O’Hanlon has written three Marshall Papers, the new signature monograph series from Brookings’s Foreign Policy program. They are: Beyond NATO: A New Security Architecture for Eastern Europe (2017), The $650 Billion Bargain: The Case for Modest Growth in America’s Defense Budget (2016), and, with Jim Steinberg, A Glass Half Full?: Rebalance, Reassurance, and Resolve in the U.S.-China Strategic Relationship (also 2017). O'Hanlon is also the author of Healing the Wounded Giant (Brookings), and Strategic Reassurance and Resolve: U.S.-China Relations in the 21st Century (the latter with Jim Steinberg, published by Princeton University Press, 2014). Previously, he wrote Bending History: Barack Obama’s Foreign Policy (with Martin Indyk and Kenneth Lieberthal, Brookings, March 2012); The Wounded Giant: America’s Armed Forces in an Age of Austerity (Penguin Press, 2011); A Skeptic’s Case for Nuclear Disarmament (Brookings, 2010); Toughing It Out in Afghanistan (with Hassina Sherjan, Brookings, 2010); and The Science of War (Princeton University Press, 2009). He continues to co-author Brookings’s Afghanistan Index.

O’Hanlon’s other books include A War Like No Other, about the U.S.-China relationship and the Taiwan issue, with Richard Bush; a multi-author volume, Protecting the Homeland 2006/2007 (Brookings, 2006); Defense Strategy for the Post-Saddam Era (Brookings, 2005); The Future of Arms Control (Brookings, 2005), co-authored with Michael Levi; Neither Star Wars nor Sanctuary: Constraining the Military Uses of Space (Brookings, 2004); and Crisis on the Korean Peninsula (McGraw-Hill) with Mike Mochizuki in 2003.

O’Hanlon has written several hundred op-eds in newspapers including The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Times, The Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Japan Times, USA Today, and Pakistan’s Dawn paper. O’Hanlon has appeared on television or spoken on the radio more than 3,000 times since September 11, 2001.

O'Hanlon was an analyst at the Congressional Budget Office from 1989 to 1994. He also worked previously at the Institute for Defense Analyses. His Ph.D. from Princeton is in public and international affairs; his B.S. and M.S., also from Princeton, are in the physical sciences. He served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Congo/Kinshasa (the former Zaire) from 1982 to 1984, where he taught college and high school physics in French.

Eric Schmitt Eric Schmitt is a senior writer covering terrorism and national security for The New York Times. Since 2007, he has reported on terrorism issues, with assignments to Pakistan, Afghanistan, North Africa, Southeast Asia among others. He is the co-author, with The Times’s Thom Shanker, of Counterstrike: The Untold Story of America’s Secret Campaign Against al Qaeda, published in 2011. He was first appointed as a Pentagon correspondent for The Times in May 1990. Mr. Schmitt served this position until February 1996, and then again from September 11, 2001, until 2006, covering issues of national security. Between 1996 and 2001, he worked as a domestic correspondent covering, among other subjects, Congress and immigration. From 1983 until 1984, Mr. Schmitt was the clerk for James Reston, then the senior columnist. He joined The Times in 1983 where he has worked a number of assignments, including those in financial and business news, commercial aviation and the travel industry, and as a Long Island correspondent. Some of Mr. Schmitt’s special projects at The Times include the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) investigation in Puerto Rico the spring of 1990, the Persian Gulf War in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait from January until March 1991, the war in Somalia in December 1992, and the conflict in Haiti in September 1994. Before joining The Times, Mr. Schmitt was an education reporter at The Tri-City Herald in Kennewick, Wash., from September 1982 until September 1983. Mr. Schmitt has shared three Pulitzer Prizes.  In 1999, he was part of a team of New York Times reporters awarded the Pulitzer for coverage of the transfer of sensitive military technology to China. In 2009, he was a part of a team of New York Times reporters awarded the Pulitzer for coverage of Afghanistan and Pakistan. And in 2017, he was part of a Pulitzer team that examined how Russia’s President Vladimir Putin projects power openly and covertly. Mr. Schmitt was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on November 2, 1959, and grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area. He received a B.A. in Political Science and third world development from Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts, in 1982. During that time, he also studied at El Instituto Internacional in Madrid for a year. He attended Harvard University’s Executive Program on National and International Security in 1991. Mr. Schmitt completed a Knight Journalism Fellowship at Stanford University in the 2006-2007 academic year.

Eric Schmitt

Eric Schmitt is a senior writer covering terrorism and national security for The New York Times. Since 2007, he has reported on terrorism issues, with assignments to Pakistan, Afghanistan, North Africa, Southeast Asia among others. He is the co-author, with The Times’s Thom Shanker, of Counterstrike: The Untold Story of America’s Secret Campaign Against al Qaeda, published in 2011.

He was first appointed as a Pentagon correspondent for The Times in May 1990. Mr. Schmitt served this position until February 1996, and then again from September 11, 2001, until 2006, covering issues of national security. Between 1996 and 2001, he worked as a domestic correspondent covering, among other subjects, Congress and immigration.

From 1983 until 1984, Mr. Schmitt was the clerk for James Reston, then the senior columnist. He joined The Times in 1983 where he has worked a number of assignments, including those in financial and business news, commercial aviation and the travel industry, and as a Long Island correspondent.

Some of Mr. Schmitt’s special projects at The Times include the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) investigation in Puerto Rico the spring of 1990, the Persian Gulf War in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait from January until March 1991, the war in Somalia in December 1992, and the conflict in Haiti in September 1994.

Before joining The Times, Mr. Schmitt was an education reporter at The Tri-City Herald in Kennewick, Wash., from September 1982 until September 1983.

Mr. Schmitt has shared three Pulitzer Prizes.  In 1999, he was part of a team of New York Times reporters awarded the Pulitzer for coverage of the transfer of sensitive military technology to China. In 2009, he was a part of a team of New York Times reporters awarded the Pulitzer for coverage of Afghanistan and Pakistan. And in 2017, he was part of a Pulitzer team that examined how Russia’s President Vladimir Putin projects power openly and covertly.

Mr. Schmitt was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on November 2, 1959, and grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area. He received a B.A. in Political Science and third world development from Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts, in 1982. During that time, he also studied at El Instituto Internacional in Madrid for a year. He attended Harvard University’s Executive Program on National and International Security in 1991. Mr. Schmitt completed a Knight Journalism Fellowship at Stanford University in the 2006-2007 academic year.

Bruce Riedel Bruce Riedel is a senior fellow and director of the Brookings Intelligence Project and part of the Brookings Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence. In addition, Riedel serves as a senior fellow in the Center for Middle East Policy. He retired in 2006 after 30 years of service at the Central Intelligence Agency, including postings overseas. He was a senior advisor on South Asia and the Middle East to the last four presidents of the United States in the staff of the National Security Council at the White House. He was also deputy assistant secretary of defense for the Near East and South Asia at the Pentagon and a senior advisor at the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in Brussels. Riedel was a member of President Bill Clinton’s peace process team and negotiated at Camp David and other Arab-Israeli summits. In addition, he organized Clinton’s trip to India in 2000. In January 2009, President Barack Obama asked him to chair a review of American policy toward Afghanistan and Pakistan, the results of which the president announced in a speech on March 27, 2009. In 2011, Riedel served as an expert advisor to the prosecution of al Qaeda terrorist Omar Farooq Abdulmutallab in Detroit. In December 2011, Prime Minister David Cameron asked him to brief the United Kingdom’s National Security Council in London on Pakistan. Riedel is the author of The Search for al Qaeda: Its Leadership, Ideology and Future (Brookings Institution Press, 2008), Deadly Embrace: Pakistan, America and the Future of the Global Jihad (Brookings Institution Press, 2011, translated into Persian) and Avoiding Armageddon: America, India and Pakistan to the Brink and Back (Brookings Institution Press, 2013). He is a contributor to Which Path to Persia? Options for a New American Strategy Toward Iran (Brookings Institution Press, 2009), The Arab Awakening: America and the Transformation of the Middle East (Brookings Institution Press, 2011), and Becoming Enemies: U.S.-Iran Relations and the Iran-Iraq War, 1979-1988 (Brookings Institution Press, 2012). His book What We Won: America’s Secret War in Afghanistan, 1979-1989 (Brookings Institution Press, 2014) won the gold medal for best new book on war and military affairs at the INDIEFAB awards. His new book is JFK's Forgotten Crisis: Tibet, the CIA and the Sino-Indian War (Brookings Institution Press, 2015). Riedel is a graduate of Brown (B.A.), Harvard (M.A.), and the Royal College of Defense Studies in London. He has taught at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service and Johns Hopkins University’s School for Advanced International Studies, and he has been a guest lecturer at Dartmouth, Harvard, Brown, and other universities. Riedel is a recipient of the Intelligence Medal of Merit and the Distinguished Intelligence Career Medal.

Bruce Riedel

Bruce Riedel is a senior fellow and director of the Brookings Intelligence Project and part of the Brookings Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence. In addition, Riedel serves as a senior fellow in the Center for Middle East Policy. He retired in 2006 after 30 years of service at the Central Intelligence Agency, including postings overseas. He was a senior advisor on South Asia and the Middle East to the last four presidents of the United States in the staff of the National Security Council at the White House. He was also deputy assistant secretary of defense for the Near East and South Asia at the Pentagon and a senior advisor at the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in Brussels.

Riedel was a member of President Bill Clinton’s peace process team and negotiated at Camp David and other Arab-Israeli summits. In addition, he organized Clinton’s trip to India in 2000. In January 2009, President Barack Obama asked him to chair a review of American policy toward Afghanistan and Pakistan, the results of which the president announced in a speech on March 27, 2009.

In 2011, Riedel served as an expert advisor to the prosecution of al Qaeda terrorist Omar Farooq Abdulmutallab in Detroit. In December 2011, Prime Minister David Cameron asked him to brief the United Kingdom’s National Security Council in London on Pakistan.

Riedel is the author of The Search for al Qaeda: Its Leadership, Ideology and Future (Brookings Institution Press, 2008), Deadly Embrace: Pakistan, America and the Future of the Global Jihad (Brookings Institution Press, 2011, translated into Persian) and Avoiding Armageddon: America, India and Pakistan to the Brink and Back (Brookings Institution Press, 2013). He is a contributor to Which Path to Persia? Options for a New American Strategy Toward Iran (Brookings Institution Press, 2009), The Arab Awakening: America and the Transformation of the Middle East (Brookings Institution Press, 2011), and Becoming Enemies: U.S.-Iran Relations and the Iran-Iraq War, 1979-1988 (Brookings Institution Press, 2012). His book What We Won: America’s Secret War in Afghanistan, 1979-1989 (Brookings Institution Press, 2014) won the gold medal for best new book on war and military affairs at the INDIEFAB awards. His new book is JFK's Forgotten Crisis: Tibet, the CIA and the Sino-Indian War (Brookings Institution Press, 2015).

Riedel is a graduate of Brown (B.A.), Harvard (M.A.), and the Royal College of Defense Studies in London. He has taught at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service and Johns Hopkins University’s School for Advanced International Studies, and he has been a guest lecturer at Dartmouth, Harvard, Brown, and other universities. Riedel is a recipient of the Intelligence Medal of Merit and the Distinguished Intelligence Career Medal.