Jane Harman   Jane Harman resigned from Congress February 28, 2011 to join the Woodrow Wilson Center as its first female Director, President, and CEO.  Representing the aerospace center of California during nine terms in Congress, she served on all the major security committees: six years on Armed Services, eight years on Intelligence, and eight on Homeland Security.  During her long public career, Ms. Harman has been recognized as a national expert at the nexus of security and public policy issues, and has received numerous awards for distinguished service.  She is a member of the Defense Policy Board, the State Department Foreign Policy Board, and the Homeland Security Advisory Committee.  She also serves on the Executive Committee of the Trilateral Commission and the Advisory Board of the Munich Security Conference.  Ms. Harman is a Trustee of the Aspen Institute and the University of Southern California.  She is also a member of the Presidential Debates Commission.  A product of Los Angeles public schools, Ms. Harman is a magna cum laude graduate of Smith College, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and of Harvard Law School.  Prior to serving in Congress, she was Staff Director of the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Constitutional Rights, Deputy Cabinet Secretary to President Jimmy Carter, Special Counsel to the Department of Defense, and in private law practice.   
  
 Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 EN-US 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
      
  
 Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 EN-US 
 JA 
 X-NONE

Jane Harman

Jane Harman resigned from Congress February 28, 2011 to join the Woodrow Wilson Center as its first female Director, President, and CEO.

Representing the aerospace center of California during nine terms in Congress, she served on all the major security committees: six years on Armed Services, eight years on Intelligence, and eight on Homeland Security.  During her long public career, Ms. Harman has been recognized as a national expert at the nexus of security and public policy issues, and has received numerous awards for distinguished service.

She is a member of the Defense Policy Board, the State Department Foreign Policy Board, and the Homeland Security Advisory Committee.  She also serves on the Executive Committee of the Trilateral Commission and the Advisory Board of the Munich Security Conference.

Ms. Harman is a Trustee of the Aspen Institute and the University of Southern California.  She is also a member of the Presidential Debates Commission.

A product of Los Angeles public schools, Ms. Harman is a magna cum laude graduate of Smith College, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and of Harvard Law School.  Prior to serving in Congress, she was Staff Director of the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Constitutional Rights, Deputy Cabinet Secretary to President Jimmy Carter, Special Counsel to the Department of Defense, and in private law practice.

  Robert Cardillo     
  
 Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 EN-US 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
      
  
 Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 EN-US 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
    Mr. Robert Cardillo is the sixth Director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). Mr. Cardillo leads and directs NGA under the authorities of the Secretary of Defense and the Director of National Intelligence. He became NGA’s director on October 3, 2014.  Prior to this assignment, Mr. Cardillo served as the first Deputy Director for Intelligence Integration, Office of the Director of National Intelligence, from 2010 to 2014. In addition, he served as the Deputy Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) and the Deputy Director for Analysis, DIA, from 2006 to 2010. In the summer of 2009, Mr. Cardillo served as the Acting J2, a first for a civilian, in support of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Before he moved to DIA, Mr. Cardillo led Analysis and Production as well as Source Operations and Management at NGA from 2002 to 2006. Mr. Cardillo’s leadership assignments at NGA also included Congressional Affairs, Public Affairs, and Corporate Relations.  Mr. Cardillo began his career with DIA in 1983 as an imagery analyst, and he was selected to the Senior Executive Service in 2000. Mr. Cardillo earned a B.A. in Government from Cornell University in 1983 and an M.A. in National Security Studies from Georgetown University in 1988.  Mr. Cardillo is the recipient of the Director of National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medal, the Presidential Rank of Distinguished Executive, the Presidential Rank of Meritorious Executive, and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Meritorious Civilian Service Award.  Mr. Cardillo resides in Northern Virginia with his wife. They have three children and three grandchildren.  
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
 table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin-top:0in;
	mso-para-margin-right:0in;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt;
	mso-para-margin-left:0in;
	line-height:107%;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:11.0pt;
	font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

Robert Cardillo

Mr. Robert Cardillo is the sixth Director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). Mr. Cardillo leads and directs NGA under the authorities of the Secretary of Defense and the Director of National Intelligence. He became NGA’s director on October 3, 2014.

Prior to this assignment, Mr. Cardillo served as the first Deputy Director for Intelligence Integration, Office of the Director of National Intelligence, from 2010 to 2014. In addition, he served as the Deputy Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) and the Deputy Director for Analysis, DIA, from 2006 to 2010. In the summer of 2009, Mr. Cardillo served as the Acting J2, a first for a civilian, in support of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Before he moved to DIA, Mr. Cardillo led Analysis and Production as well as Source Operations and Management at NGA from 2002 to 2006. Mr. Cardillo’s leadership assignments at NGA also included Congressional Affairs, Public Affairs, and Corporate Relations.

Mr. Cardillo began his career with DIA in 1983 as an imagery analyst, and he was selected to the Senior Executive Service in 2000. Mr. Cardillo earned a B.A. in Government from Cornell University in 1983 and an M.A. in National Security Studies from Georgetown University in 1988.

Mr. Cardillo is the recipient of the Director of National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medal, the Presidential Rank of Distinguished Executive, the Presidential Rank of Meritorious Executive, and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Meritorious Civilian Service Award.

Mr. Cardillo resides in Northern Virginia with his wife. They have three children and three grandchildren.

  Billy Jack     
  
 
  
    
  
 Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 EN-US 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
    Dr. Billy Jack is Vice Provost of Research and Professor of Economics at Georgetown University. He is also director of gui2de, the Georgetown University Initiative on Innovation, Development and Evaluation, which conducts empirical field-based research to assess the impact and effectiveness of development interventions. Previously he held positions on the Joint Committee on Taxation of the US Congress, the International Monetary Fund, the Australian National University, and the University of Sydney. He holds a B.S. in Mathematics and Physics from the University of Western Australia and an M.Phil. and Ph.D. in Economics from Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar.

Billy Jack

Dr. Billy Jack is Vice Provost of Research and Professor of Economics at Georgetown University. He is also director of gui2de, the Georgetown University Initiative on Innovation, Development and Evaluation, which conducts empirical field-based research to assess the impact and effectiveness of development interventions. Previously he held positions on the Joint Committee on Taxation of the US Congress, the International Monetary Fund, the Australian National University, and the University of Sydney. He holds a B.S. in Mathematics and Physics from the University of Western Australia and an M.Phil. and Ph.D. in Economics from Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar.

 
  Keir Leiber     
  
 Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 EN-US 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
      
  
 Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 EN-US 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
    Professor Keir A. Lieber is Director of the Center for Security Studies and Security Studies Program at Georgetown University and Associate Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service.  He also holds a joint appointment with the Department of Government. Professor Lieber’s research and teaching interests include nuclear weapons, strategy, and deterrence; the causes of war; U.S. foreign and national security policy; and international relations theory.   He is author of War and the Engineers: The Primacy of Politics over Technology (Cornell University Press) and editor of War, Peace, and International Political Realism (University of Notre Dame Press).  His articles have appeared in leading scholarly and foreign policy publications, including International Security, Security Studies, Foreign Affairs, and the Atlantic Monthly. Professor Lieber has been awarded major fellowships from the Brookings Institution, Carnegie Corporation of New York, Council on Foreign Relations, Earhart Foundation, MacArthur Foundation, and Smith Richardson Foundation. Professor Lieber received his M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago, his B.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and he is a proud product of the D.C. public schools.    
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
 table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin-top:0in;
	mso-para-margin-right:0in;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt;
	mso-para-margin-left:0in;
	line-height:107%;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:11.0pt;
	font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

Keir Leiber

Professor Keir A. Lieber is Director of the Center for Security Studies and Security Studies Program at Georgetown University and Associate Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service.  He also holds a joint appointment with the Department of Government. Professor Lieber’s research and teaching interests include nuclear weapons, strategy, and deterrence; the causes of war; U.S. foreign and national security policy; and international relations theory. 

He is author of War and the Engineers: The Primacy of Politics over Technology (Cornell University Press) and editor of War, Peace, and International Political Realism (University of Notre Dame Press).  His articles have appeared in leading scholarly and foreign policy publications, including International Security, Security Studies, Foreign Affairs, and the Atlantic Monthly. Professor Lieber has been awarded major fellowships from the Brookings Institution, Carnegie Corporation of New York, Council on Foreign Relations, Earhart Foundation, MacArthur Foundation, and Smith Richardson Foundation. Professor Lieber received his M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago, his B.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and he is a proud product of the D.C. public schools.

  David Martin   David Martin has been CBS News’s national security correspondent, covering the Pentagon and the State Department, since 1993. In that capacity, he has reported virtually every major defense, intelligence, and international affairs story for the “CBS Evening News,” as well as for other broadcasts, including “60 Minutes” and “48 Hours.” He also contributed to “60 Minutes Wednesday.”  During the invasion of Afghanistan and the war in Iraq, Martin’s in-depth knowledge of how the State Department, intelligence community, and military operate—both on the battlefield and in Washington—positioned him as the “big picture” reporter for CBS News. Utilizing his own sources and reports from CBS News correspondents in the region and around the world, as well as in Washington, he explained and assessed the military’s strategies and operations for viewers.  Martin broke several significant stories before and during the Iraq war. He was the first to report on the opening night of the war, that the United States was launching a strike on a palace bunker in southern Baghdad in an attempt to take out Saddam Hussein. Martin also broke the story of the military’s “shock and awe” strategy for its initial strike on Baghdad. During a trip to Iraq in May 2003, he was the first journalist to visit and report on Dora Farms, where Saddam was said by the CIA to have been hiding on the opening night of the war.  Martin has received several Emmys, most recently in 2012 for his story “Starting Over.” He has also received two Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards (2002 and 2004) for his body of work, most of which has appeared on the “CBS Evening News” and “60 Minutes Wednesday.”  Regarding the first Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University Award, the award committee said that his “consistently excellent reporting on the beat of national security hit its peak this year....break[ing] news on a wide range of defense and security stories with details that only experience and doggedness can ferret out. This is exemplary reporting that repeatedly breaks through the barriers of official statements.”  In awarding the second DuPont, the committee said, “David Martin’s reports on the Pentagon, the military build-up to the Iraq war and on the war itself demonstrate his exceptional grasp of national security issues. Teamed with his long-time producer, Mary Walsh, Martin consistently breaks new information with clear reporting on the Pentagon’s goals. He exemplifies the role of a journalist: to measure what we are being told against what we find out.”  Martin also received the 2004 Joan S. Barone Award for excellence in Washington-based national affairs and public policy reporting awarded by the Washington Radio & Television Correspondents’ Association.  He joined CBS News as its Pentagon correspondent in 1983. Martin’s duties later expanded to include the State Department and intelligence beats.  Before that, he covered defense and intelligence matters for Newsweek magazine from its Washington bureau (1977-83). Martin was a reporter with the Associated Press in Washington (1973-77), covering the FBI and CIA. He also was a member of the AP special assignment team (1977).  Martin began his journalism career as a researcher for CBS News in New York in 1969. He then became a news writer with the AP broadcast wire (1971-72) and a fellow at the Washington Journalism Center (1973).  Martin is the author of two books, “Wilderness of Mirrors” (Harper & Row, 1980), an account of the secret wars between the CIA and KGB, and “Best Laid Plans: The Inside Story of America's War Against Terrorism” (Harper & Row, 1988).  He was born July 28, 1943, in Washington, D.C. He graduated from Yale University in 1965 with a bachelor’s degree in English. During the Vietnam War, Martin served as an officer aboard a U.S. Navy destroyer.  Martin and his wife, Dr. Elinor Martin, live in Chevy Chase, Maryland. They have four children.

David Martin

David Martin has been CBS News’s national security correspondent, covering the Pentagon and the State Department, since 1993. In that capacity, he has reported virtually every major defense, intelligence, and international affairs story for the “CBS Evening News,” as well as for other broadcasts, including “60 Minutes” and “48 Hours.” He also contributed to “60 Minutes Wednesday.”

During the invasion of Afghanistan and the war in Iraq, Martin’s in-depth knowledge of how the State Department, intelligence community, and military operate—both on the battlefield and in Washington—positioned him as the “big picture” reporter for CBS News. Utilizing his own sources and reports from CBS News correspondents in the region and around the world, as well as in Washington, he explained and assessed the military’s strategies and operations for viewers.

Martin broke several significant stories before and during the Iraq war. He was the first to report on the opening night of the war, that the United States was launching a strike on a palace bunker in southern Baghdad in an attempt to take out Saddam Hussein. Martin also broke the story of the military’s “shock and awe” strategy for its initial strike on Baghdad. During a trip to Iraq in May 2003, he was the first journalist to visit and report on Dora Farms, where Saddam was said by the CIA to have been hiding on the opening night of the war.

Martin has received several Emmys, most recently in 2012 for his story “Starting Over.” He has also received two Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards (2002 and 2004) for his body of work, most of which has appeared on the “CBS Evening News” and “60 Minutes Wednesday.”

Regarding the first Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University Award, the award committee said that his “consistently excellent reporting on the beat of national security hit its peak this year....break[ing] news on a wide range of defense and security stories with details that only experience and doggedness can ferret out. This is exemplary reporting that repeatedly breaks through the barriers of official statements.”

In awarding the second DuPont, the committee said, “David Martin’s reports on the Pentagon, the military build-up to the Iraq war and on the war itself demonstrate his exceptional grasp of national security issues. Teamed with his long-time producer, Mary Walsh, Martin consistently breaks new information with clear reporting on the Pentagon’s goals. He exemplifies the role of a journalist: to measure what we are being told against what we find out.”

Martin also received the 2004 Joan S. Barone Award for excellence in Washington-based national affairs and public policy reporting awarded by the Washington Radio & Television Correspondents’ Association.

He joined CBS News as its Pentagon correspondent in 1983. Martin’s duties later expanded to include the State Department and intelligence beats.

Before that, he covered defense and intelligence matters for Newsweek magazine from its Washington bureau (1977-83). Martin was a reporter with the Associated Press in Washington (1973-77), covering the FBI and CIA. He also was a member of the AP special assignment team (1977).

Martin began his journalism career as a researcher for CBS News in New York in 1969. He then became a news writer with the AP broadcast wire (1971-72) and a fellow at the Washington Journalism Center (1973).

Martin is the author of two books, “Wilderness of Mirrors” (Harper & Row, 1980), an account of the secret wars between the CIA and KGB, and “Best Laid Plans: The Inside Story of America's War Against Terrorism” (Harper & Row, 1988).

He was born July 28, 1943, in Washington, D.C. He graduated from Yale University in 1965 with a bachelor’s degree in English. During the Vietnam War, Martin served as an officer aboard a U.S. Navy destroyer.

Martin and his wife, Dr. Elinor Martin, live in Chevy Chase, Maryland. They have four children.

     Michael O’Hanlon   Dr. Michael O'Hanlon is a senior fellow in Foreign Policy at the Brookings Institution, where he specializes in U.S. defense strategy, the use of military force, and American national security policy. He is also director of research for the Foreign Policy program at Brookings. He is an adjunct professor at Columbia, Princeton, and Syracuse universities, and the University of Denver. He is also a member of the International Institute for Strategic Studies. O’Hanlon was a member of the external advisory board at the Central Intelligence Agency from 2011 to 2012.  O’Hanlon’s latest book is The Future of Land Warfare (Brookings, 2015). Since then, O’Hanlon has written three Marshall Papers, the new signature monograph series from Brookings’s Foreign Policy program. They are: Beyond NATO: A New Security Architecture for Eastern Europe (2017), The $650 Billion Bargain: The Case for Modest Growth in America’s Defense Budget (2016), and, with Jim Steinberg, A Glass Half Full?: Rebalance, Reassurance, and Resolve in the U.S.-China Strategic Relationship (also 2017). O'Hanlon is also the author of Healing the Wounded Giant (Brookings), and Strategic Reassurance and Resolve: U.S.-China Relations in the 21st Century (the latter with Jim Steinberg, published by Princeton University Press, 2014). Previously, he wrote Bending History: Barack Obama’s Foreign Policy (with Martin Indyk and Kenneth Lieberthal, Brookings, March 2012); The Wounded Giant: America’s Armed Forces in an Age of Austerity (Penguin Press, 2011); A Skeptic’s Case for Nuclear Disarmament (Brookings, 2010); Toughing It Out in Afghanistan (with Hassina Sherjan, Brookings, 2010); and The Science of War (Princeton University Press, 2009). He continues to co-author Brookings’s Afghanistan Index.  O’Hanlon’s other books include A War Like No Other, about the U.S.-China relationship and the Taiwan issue, with Richard Bush; a multi-author volume, Protecting the Homeland 2006/2007 (Brookings, 2006); Defense Strategy for the Post-Saddam Era (Brookings, 2005); The Future of Arms Control (Brookings, 2005), co-authored with Michael Levi; Neither Star Wars nor Sanctuary: Constraining the Military Uses of Space (Brookings, 2004); and Crisis on the Korean Peninsula (McGraw-Hill) with Mike Mochizuki in 2003.  O’Hanlon has written several hundred op-eds in newspapers including The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Times, The Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Japan Times, USA Today, and Pakistan’s Dawn paper. O’Hanlon has appeared on television or spoken on the radio more than 3,000 times since September 11, 2001.  O'Hanlon was an analyst at the Congressional Budget Office from 1989 to 1994. He also worked previously at the Institute for Defense Analyses. His Ph.D. from Princeton is in public and international affairs; his B.S. and M.S., also from Princeton, are in the physical sciences. He served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Congo/Kinshasa (the former Zaire) from 1982 to 1984, where he taught college and high school physics in French.    
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
 table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin-top:0in;
	mso-para-margin-right:0in;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt;
	mso-para-margin-left:0in;
	line-height:107%;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:11.0pt;
	font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

 Michael O’Hanlon

Dr. Michael O'Hanlon is a senior fellow in Foreign Policy at the Brookings Institution, where he specializes in U.S. defense strategy, the use of military force, and American national security policy. He is also director of research for the Foreign Policy program at Brookings. He is an adjunct professor at Columbia, Princeton, and Syracuse universities, and the University of Denver. He is also a member of the International Institute for Strategic Studies. O’Hanlon was a member of the external advisory board at the Central Intelligence Agency from 2011 to 2012.

O’Hanlon’s latest book is The Future of Land Warfare (Brookings, 2015). Since then, O’Hanlon has written three Marshall Papers, the new signature monograph series from Brookings’s Foreign Policy program. They are: Beyond NATO: A New Security Architecture for Eastern Europe (2017), The $650 Billion Bargain: The Case for Modest Growth in America’s Defense Budget (2016), and, with Jim Steinberg, A Glass Half Full?: Rebalance, Reassurance, and Resolve in the U.S.-China Strategic Relationship (also 2017). O'Hanlon is also the author of Healing the Wounded Giant (Brookings), and Strategic Reassurance and Resolve: U.S.-China Relations in the 21st Century (the latter with Jim Steinberg, published by Princeton University Press, 2014). Previously, he wrote Bending History: Barack Obama’s Foreign Policy (with Martin Indyk and Kenneth Lieberthal, Brookings, March 2012); The Wounded Giant: America’s Armed Forces in an Age of Austerity (Penguin Press, 2011); A Skeptic’s Case for Nuclear Disarmament (Brookings, 2010); Toughing It Out in Afghanistan (with Hassina Sherjan, Brookings, 2010); and The Science of War (Princeton University Press, 2009). He continues to co-author Brookings’s Afghanistan Index.

O’Hanlon’s other books include A War Like No Other, about the U.S.-China relationship and the Taiwan issue, with Richard Bush; a multi-author volume, Protecting the Homeland 2006/2007 (Brookings, 2006); Defense Strategy for the Post-Saddam Era (Brookings, 2005); The Future of Arms Control (Brookings, 2005), co-authored with Michael Levi; Neither Star Wars nor Sanctuary: Constraining the Military Uses of Space (Brookings, 2004); and Crisis on the Korean Peninsula (McGraw-Hill) with Mike Mochizuki in 2003.

O’Hanlon has written several hundred op-eds in newspapers including The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Times, The Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Japan Times, USA Today, and Pakistan’s Dawn paper. O’Hanlon has appeared on television or spoken on the radio more than 3,000 times since September 11, 2001.

O'Hanlon was an analyst at the Congressional Budget Office from 1989 to 1994. He also worked previously at the Institute for Defense Analyses. His Ph.D. from Princeton is in public and international affairs; his B.S. and M.S., also from Princeton, are in the physical sciences. He served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Congo/Kinshasa (the former Zaire) from 1982 to 1984, where he taught college and high school physics in French.