Panel 2: Information Sharing in a Multipolar World

The global balance of power is shifting, and this redistribution holds the potential to recalibrate intelligence priorities and partnerships. These uncertainties come as the world faces threats that demand increased global cooperation, such as the rise of transnational non-state actors and volatile rogue states. Panelists will discuss how they anticipate the United States, its allies, and its adversaries may reorient their intelligence sharing policies in response to oncoming global shifts in power.

Dina Temple-Raston(moderator) Dina Temple-Raston has been NPR’s counter-terrorism correspondent for a decade. She is on leave from the network to work on a podcast that looks at the brain science behind adolescent decisions. It will be available in the fall.  

Dina Temple-Raston(moderator)

Dina Temple-Raston has been NPR’s counter-terrorism correspondent for a decade. She is on leave from the network to work on a podcast that looks at the brain science behind adolescent decisions. It will be available in the fall.

 

Josh Kerbel Josh Kerbel is a member of the research faculty at the National Intelligence University (NIU), the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC)'s sole accredited and degree-granting educational/research institution. At NIU his primary focus is anticipatory intelligence—how the IC can better anticipate the emergent dynamics spawned by an increasingly complex security environment. More specifically, he explores the disruptive innovations demanded of the IC by a security environment that is fundamentally different from the Cold War environment that still profoundly—and problematically—shapes its legacy mindsets, processes, and habits. Prior to joining NIU, Mr. Kerbel held senior analytically-focused positions in the Defense Intelligence Agency; in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, including the National Intelligence Council; on the Navy staff; in the Central Intelligence Agency; and with the Office of Naval Intelligence. His unclassified writings on the intersections of government (especially intelligence) and complexity have been published in Foreign Policy, The Washington Post, Studies in Intelligence, The National Interest, War on the Rocks, Defense One, Parameters, and other outlets. Mr. Kerbel has degrees from the George Washington University and the London School of Economics, as well as professional certifications from the Naval War College and the Naval Postgraduate School. He was also a post-graduate (Seminar XXI) fellow in the Center for International Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Josh Kerbel

Josh Kerbel is a member of the research faculty at the National Intelligence University (NIU), the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC)'s sole accredited and degree-granting educational/research institution. At NIU his primary focus is anticipatory intelligence—how the IC can better anticipate the emergent dynamics spawned by an increasingly complex security environment. More specifically, he explores the disruptive innovations demanded of the IC by a security environment that is fundamentally different from the Cold War environment that still profoundly—and problematically—shapes its legacy mindsets, processes, and habits.

Prior to joining NIU, Mr. Kerbel held senior analytically-focused positions in the Defense Intelligence Agency; in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, including the National Intelligence Council; on the Navy staff; in the Central Intelligence Agency; and with the Office of Naval Intelligence. His unclassified writings on the intersections of government (especially intelligence) and complexity have been published in Foreign Policy, The Washington Post, Studies in Intelligence, The National Interest, War on the Rocks, Defense One, Parameters, and other outlets.

Mr. Kerbel has degrees from the George Washington University and the London School of Economics, as well as professional certifications from the Naval War College and the Naval Postgraduate School. He was also a post-graduate (Seminar XXI) fellow in the Center for International Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Paula Doyle Paula Doyle is an adjunct professor with the Georgetown University Center for Security Studies. She has more than 30 years of national security and foreign policy experience with the Central Intelligence Agency, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, and the U.S. Department of State in positions of increasing responsibility in Washington and overseas.  Her areas of deep subject matter expertise include cybersecurity, foreign cyber programs and capabilities, counterintelligence, foreign nuclear weapons and proliferation programs, the Middle East, the Levant, and NATO. Most recently, Ms. Doyle was the Associate Deputy Director of the CIA for Operations Technology from 2014 to 2016. She also served as the Deputy National Counterintelligence Executive from 2012 to 2014, during which she spearheaded the Intelligence Community's damage assessment of Edward Snowden's defection to Russia. Ms. Doyle also led three CIA stations abroad. She earned a B.A. in International Affairs and B.S. in International Business from the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Paula Doyle

Paula Doyle is an adjunct professor with the Georgetown University Center for Security Studies. She has more than 30 years of national security and foreign policy experience with the Central Intelligence Agency, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, and the U.S. Department of State in positions of increasing responsibility in Washington and overseas.  Her areas of deep subject matter expertise include cybersecurity, foreign cyber programs and capabilities, counterintelligence, foreign nuclear weapons and proliferation programs, the Middle East, the Levant, and NATO.

Most recently, Ms. Doyle was the Associate Deputy Director of the CIA for Operations Technology from 2014 to 2016. She also served as the Deputy National Counterintelligence Executive from 2012 to 2014, during which she spearheaded the Intelligence Community's damage assessment of Edward Snowden's defection to Russia. Ms. Doyle also led three CIA stations abroad. She earned a B.A. in International Affairs and B.S. in International Business from the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Dustin Gard-Weiss Mr. Gard-Weiss is currently the Director of the Office of Geospatial Intelligence Management at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), a position he has held since October 2015. He is charged with executing Geospatial Intelligence (GEOINT) Functional Management on behalf of the Director, NGA, as the GEOINT Functional Manager and DoD GEOINT Manager, and is responsible for overseeing the National System for Geospatial Intelligence and the Allied System for Geospatial Intelligence. Previously, Mr. Gard-Weiss served on the staff of the Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV) as the Assistant Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence and was dual-hatted as the Assistant Head of the Naval Intelligence Activity (NIA). In these positions, he supported the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance - Director of Naval Intelligence (OPNAV N2/N6) and Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence / Head, NIA in delivering comprehensive intelligence to Navy leadership, representing the Navy as one of the 17 members of the U.S. Intelligence Community, and managing and overseeing the Navy’s intelligence activities, $4B in resources, and 20,000 personnel. He was appointed to the Defense Intelligence Senior Executive Service in 2012, initially serving as the Acting Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence. Mr. Gard-Weiss began his career as an intern at the Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI). While at ONI, he served on the team responsible for managing Navy’s foreign intelligence relationships and was later selected to lead this team. Following his transition to OPNAV, he served as a senior strategy and policy advisor to the Director of Naval Intelligence, established and led a Program Analysis and Evaluation Office to measure the performance and return on investment of Navy’s intelligence resources, and was named Special Assistant to the Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence. Mr. Gard-Weiss was subsequently assigned to DIA’s Joint Intelligence Task Force – Combating Terrorism as the Deputy Counter Terrorism (CT) Mission Manager. At DIA, he established a new organization to lead the Department of Defense’s CT Intelligence Enterprise and served as its primary representative to the National Counterterrorism Center and broader U.S. Government. Upon his return to OPNAV, Mr. Gard-Weiss led the office responsible for delivering intelligence to the Secretary of the Navy, Chief of Naval Operations, and their staffs. Mr. Gard-Weiss earned a B.A. in International Relations from Brown University and a M.B.A. from Northwestern University’s Kellogg Graduate School of Management.

Dustin Gard-Weiss

Mr. Gard-Weiss is currently the Director of the Office of Geospatial Intelligence Management at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), a position he has held since October 2015. He is charged with executing Geospatial Intelligence (GEOINT) Functional Management on behalf of the Director, NGA, as the GEOINT Functional Manager and DoD GEOINT Manager, and is responsible for overseeing the National System for Geospatial Intelligence and the Allied System for Geospatial Intelligence.

Previously, Mr. Gard-Weiss served on the staff of the Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV) as the Assistant Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence and was dual-hatted as the Assistant Head of the Naval Intelligence Activity (NIA). In these positions, he supported the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance - Director of Naval Intelligence (OPNAV N2/N6) and Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence / Head, NIA in delivering comprehensive intelligence to Navy leadership, representing the Navy as one of the 17 members of the U.S. Intelligence Community, and managing and overseeing the Navy’s intelligence activities, $4B in resources, and 20,000 personnel. He was appointed to the Defense Intelligence Senior Executive Service in 2012, initially serving as the Acting Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence.

Mr. Gard-Weiss began his career as an intern at the Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI). While at ONI, he served on the team responsible for managing Navy’s foreign intelligence relationships and was later selected to lead this team.

Following his transition to OPNAV, he served as a senior strategy and policy advisor to the Director of Naval Intelligence, established and led a Program Analysis and Evaluation Office to measure the performance and return on investment of Navy’s intelligence resources, and was named Special Assistant to the Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence.

Mr. Gard-Weiss was subsequently assigned to DIA’s Joint Intelligence Task Force – Combating Terrorism as the Deputy Counter Terrorism (CT) Mission Manager. At DIA, he established a new organization to lead the Department of Defense’s CT Intelligence Enterprise and served as its primary representative to the National Counterterrorism Center and broader U.S. Government.

Upon his return to OPNAV, Mr. Gard-Weiss led the office responsible for delivering intelligence to the Secretary of the Navy, Chief of Naval Operations, and their staffs.

Mr. Gard-Weiss earned a B.A. in International Relations from Brown University and a M.B.A. from Northwestern University’s Kellogg Graduate School of Management.